April 18, 2014

The Queen of Thorns does not have time for this Claire’s level jewelry.

(Source: akscully, via afternoonsnoozebutton)

March 17, 2014
Tumblr and its culture of positivity

bijan:

I was recently at a tech conference and there were a number of interesting speakers.

One of my favorite sessions was hearing Marissa Mayer, CEO at Yahoo talk about her challenges and progress at Yahoo. It was fascinating and I left with even more respect for her than I had previously.

At one…

March 15, 2014
"Just because someone provides you with numeric results, does not mean they are significant, or that you should rely on them to make a decision."

— Darren Woolley. “Lies, damn lies and marketing pseudo-statistics and their impact” (via peterspear)

March 15, 2014
twicr:

Pole-dancing robots? Humanity will pay dearly for this one day, I am sure. 

twicr:

Pole-dancing robots? Humanity will pay dearly for this one day, I am sure. 

(Source: newrisingmedia.com)

March 13, 2014
"The disappointment of the ‘True Detective’ finale suggests how we are entering a confusing and precarious time in television’s evolution: we approach a show as an artistic achievement with all the privileges and responsibilities that this brings, when we may have done better to embrace it instead as pleasurable genre trash."

Rachel Syme on the art of the television finale: http://nyr.kr/1i8iffw (via newyorker)

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

March 13, 2014
helloyoucreatives:

Okay now that selfie is official done. 

helloyoucreatives:

Okay now that selfie is official done. 

March 7, 2014

Anonymous asked: Have you ever found it frustrating having to do something you don't want to (as in, doesn't tickle your fancy) but it helps pay the bills?

johnleedraws:

image

So, let me tell you a quick story:

My grandpa on my dad’s side came over from China when he was pretty young— grew up in Chicago. He was in high school when World War 2 broke out; he joined up, and was put in the 407th Air Service Squadron. It was part of the famed Flying Tigers fighter group, and one of the first all Chinese-American units in the military. He fixed planes. He also shot at them when they strafed the airfield. With a pistol.

He was there when the Japanese officially signed the surrender, and was honorably discharged soon after. The very first thing that he bought with his stashed up pay was a sterling silver bracelet with his serial number on it.

I keep it within sight of my desk at all times.

After the war, he went back to Chicago, but his father was already housing too many Chinese immigrant workers (up to this point, most Chinese immigrants were single men because of strict immigration laws and quotas), so he had to move to Detroit to live with an uncle and finish high school.

One of his high school teachers noted his artistic abilities, and recommended that he use his GI Bill to go to art school. Of course, his dad wouldn’t have it. So, he worked in laundromats, owned his own grocery, and later worked as an insurance salesman instead.

70 years later, I’m the graduate of an art school, and I’m taking a break from drawing to write this out.

I guess my point is this: the time that you use to pursue art has to come from somewhere. At some point, a sacrifice was made by you, or others, to allow you to have that time. Illustrators try to make a living in that intersection of art and commerce in an effort to lessen that sacrifice. There are some that are doing quite well at that. There are many, many more that are not.

Even those artists who we view as extremely successful have to sacrifice time. It just comes from other places: relationships, health, or family, etc. The real struggle then, is to find that balance on how you are spending your time.

If you know that a life spent making art is your ultimate goal, then doing things you don’t like aren’t really frustrations. They are necessities that must be done to give yourself time.

I think this is why I cringe every time I hear someone say that self-righteous creed of the “creative class”: “Do what you love, and you’ll never work a day in your life.” That statement discounts all the hard work and sacrifices that you or others have made to be in that situation—what on Earth would entitle us to only work jobs that we love?

I don’t do this because I love it. I do it because I must.

It’s in my bones.

March 7, 2014
flavorpill:

Because, let’s be honest, it was a little confusing the first time.
Your Comprehensive Guide to Re-Watching ‘True Detective’: Episodes 1-4

flavorpill:

Because, let’s be honest, it was a little confusing the first time.

Your Comprehensive Guide to Re-Watching ‘True Detective’: Episodes 1-4

March 7, 2014
theparisreview:

“If Anderson likes to invent and inhabit bygone worlds, Zweig actually lived in them, and the sense of loss is more acutely felt in his work.”
Kevin Nguyen on Wes Anderson, Stefan Zweig, and their sumptuous surroundings.

theparisreview:

“If Anderson likes to invent and inhabit bygone worlds, Zweig actually lived in them, and the sense of loss is more acutely felt in his work.”

Kevin Nguyen on Wes Anderson, Stefan Zweig, and their sumptuous surroundings.

March 7, 2014
"My brother is an asshole. What you don’t know about him is that he’s worked on classified stuff. His life was a complete blank for a while. You’re not going to be able to get to him. He’ll deny everything. He’ll never admit to starting Bitcoin."

Arthur Nakamoto, Satoshi Nakamoto’s youngest sibling, speaking to Leah McGrath Goodman about his brother.

Still not sure what to think about this entire story — beyond a few good but obvious jokes — but it’s certainly fascinating.

(via parislemon)